Roofing Toronto

Before hiring a roofing Toronto company, the homeowner must get answers to these questions. Doing so will save time, money and headaches.

Is there a builder’s lien release in the contract?

When a roofer takes on a job, he will likely be running up a bill from a supplier as he draws material for the job. This arrangement allows the roofing company to secure all the material he needs to complete the job. It’s done this way because the homeowner usually doesn’t pay the roofer first. The roofer gets paid after the job is completed. The supplier also expects to be paid when the job is done.

If the supplier doesn’t get paid, state laws allow him to file a builders’ or mechanics’ lien against the homeowner. This means that the supplier can legally hold the homeowner liable for the material used on the job. This lien is a statuary charge against real property by a supplier who contributed goods for the improvement of that property. The builders’ lien has been around since the time of the Roman Empire, and all courts recognize this legal concept.

To avoid a builders’ lien, homeowners must be certain that a builders’ lien release is written into the contract before the first roofing nail goes in. This release takes the homeowner off the hook by ensuring the supplier is paid.

Are you insured?

Insurance is critical in case a worker gets injured on the job. An injured worker can sue the homeowner for medical expenses and lost wages. Be certain that the roofing contractor carries the correct insurance to cover accidents and mishaps.

Who secures the building permits?

This is normally the job of the roofing company. All the proper building permits must be paid for and certified before the job begins. Failing to do so can result in fines against the homeowner. In addition, the county or city inspector can stop all work until the proper permits are displayed. This can be an incredible hassle if winter or the rainy season is coming on and the work is stopped. This matter of building permits and who must secure them must be clearly stated in the contract.

Are the materials and labor guaranteed?

In most cases, the manufacturer of the roofing material will warranty this material. The warranty might be for 15, 20 or 30 years. The homeowner should also ask for a warranty on labor. The labor warranty will be negotiated between the roofing contractor and the homeowner. This is a good practice in the event of some material failing. Fixing a cracked joist is not within the skill of most homeowners.

How long will the job take?

A start date and an estimated completion date should be in the contract. The homeowner should be aware that the contractor may have several jobs going on simultaneously. If a job at another site is stopped because materials are not available, the roofer may pull the crew off the homeowner’s job to complete a prior commitment when those goods arrive. A completion date will act as incentive that the job will be completed in time.

By getting answers to these questions from a roofing contractor, the homeowner will be assured of a professional job that’s done well, on time and at a competitive price.

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